Understanding ADHD | For Parents & Caregivers | Treatment Overview
The National Resource Center

Treatment Overview

treatment

A comprehensive treatment approach for children and adolescents with ADHD will ensure the greatest opportunities for success. After your child or teen has completed a thorough assessment process by an ADHD-trained mental health or healthcare provider, you will be informed of the key areas of concern that affect your child’s functioning. These areas can include school challenges, self-esteem or anger management issues, co-occurring disorders such as depression or anxiety, any learning concerns, and peer and family relationships. You and your provider will then jointly develop a “treatment plan” that prioritizes and addresses these problem areas for your child.

A comprehensive treatment plan can include all or some of the following based on the unique needs of your child, available resources and prioritization of need:

  • ADHD education about the disorder and its causes
  • Parent and child education about ADHD diagnosis and the course of treatment
  • Behavioral therapy for your child to manage his/her behaviors and acquire new skills
  • ADHD medication prescription and regular monitoring
  • Mental health counseling for your child, you or the family to address relationship, self-esteem, discipline and parenting concerns, among others
  • Parent training classes or programs to address your child’s behavior
  • Educational program modifications and supports, including 504 Plans, tutoring and special education programs

In general, more than one intervention is needed. By working closely with your health care providers and school personnel, you will be able to engage in treatment options that are most suited to the unique needs of your child and family.

     


Connect with others
Talk to Specialist
Sign up for ADHD Newsletter
NRC Library
Ask the Expert Webcasts
The information provided on this website was supported by Cooperative Agreement Number NU38DD005376 funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services.

Terms of Use